THE TRYING TIMES OF KING TRUMP AND LESSENS OF HISTORY IN LITERATURE

THE TRYING TIMES OF KING TRUMP AND LESSENS OF HISTORY IN LITERATURE

By

Harry C. Baney III

When we live through “times that try men’s souls,” and this is certainly such a time, often our literature gives us poignantly a deeper insight into the moral dilemmas and the depths of the human frailty, depravity, and the undoing of man and society. Few come closer to reaching that height than William Shakespeare, and I have to add Dante and Milton. Here in place of my usual analysis of our destructive and cruel Trump gang and the global challenges and butchery of our times, is from the 16th Century a voice that is indeed for our age:

Fall of Wolsey
By William Shakespeare (1564–1616), From Henry VIII, Act III, Scene 2.

Wolsey.
Cromwell, I did not think to shed a tear
In all my miseries; but thou hast forced me,
Out of thy honest truth, to play the woman.
Let’s dry our eyes: and thus far hear me, Cromwell;
And, when I am forgotten, as I shall be,
And sleep in dull cold marble, where no mention
Of me more must be heard of, say, I taught thee,
Say, Wolsey, that once trod the ways of glory,
And sounded all the depths and shoals of honour,
Found thee a way, out of his wreck, to rise in;
A sure and safe one, though thy master miss’d it.
Mark but my fall, and that that ruin’d me.
Cromwell, I charge thee, fling away ambition:
By that sin fell the angels; how can man, then,
The image of his Maker, hope to win by it?
Love thyself last: cherish those hearts that hate thee;
Corruption wins not more than honesty.
Still in thy right hand carry gentle peace.
To silence envious tongues. Be just, and fear not:
Let all the ends thou aim’st at be thy country’s,
Thy God’s, and truth’s; then if thou fall’st, O Cromwell,
Thou fall’st a blessed martyr! Serve the king;
And,—prithee, lead me in:
There take an inventory of all I have,
To the last penny; ’tis the king’s: my robe,
And my integrity to heaven, is all
I dare now call mine own. O Cromwell, Cromwell!
Had I but served my God with half the zeal
I served my king, he would not in mine age
Have left me naked to mine enemies.

And from William Shakespeare: “Measure for Measure”
“But man, proud man,
Dress’d in a little brief authority,
Most ignorant of what he’s most assur’d—
His glassy essence—like an angry ape
Plays such fantastic tricks before high heaven
As makes the angels weep; who, with our spleens,
Would all themselves laugh mortal.”

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